Craigslist Sex Ads Dead

Ever so quietly, one of the world’s largest advertising websites has turned off its listings for sex services.

The legality of Craigslist’s adult services section was well established – a provision of the Communications Decency Act shields websites from liability for user posting – but the company has been under pressure from US state attorneys general and, more recently, from aggressive questioning by CNN.

Actual former prostitutes, and some advocates for them, meanwhile, have argued that Craigslist offered a less exploitive, more visible and safer venue for the sale of sex.

More at Gawker. (Image source: Gawker)

ABOUT CRAIGSLIST:

Craig Newmark began the service in 1995 as an email distribution list of friends, featuring local events in the San Francisco Bay Area, before becoming a web-based service in 1996. After incorporation as a private for-profit company in 1999, Craigslist expanded into nine more U.S. cities in 2000, four in 2001 and 2002 each, and 14 in 2003.

In 2009, Craigslist operated with a staff of 28 people. Its main source of revenue is paid job ads in select cities – $75 per ad for the San Francisco Bay Area; $25 per ad for New York City, Los Angeles, San Diego, Boston, Seattle, Washington D.C., Chicago, Philadelphia and Portland, Oregon – and paid broker apartment listings in New York City ($10 per ad).

The site serves over twenty billion page views per month, putting it in 33rd place overall among web sites worldwide and 7th place overall among web sites in the United States (per Alexa.com on June 28, 2010), with over 49.4 million unique monthly visitors in the United States alone (per Compete.com on January 8, 2010).

With over eighty million new classified advertisements each month, Craigslist is the leading classifieds service in any medium. The site receives over two million new job listings each month, making it one of the top job boards in the world. The classified advertisements range from traditional buy/sell ads and community announcements to personal ads. (Wikipedia)

 
 
 

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